It’s Live! CHIME Digital Exhibits Launches

This is the third in a series of guest posts submitted by the members of the CHIME Digital Exhibits group that document the group’s development of a digital exhibit featuring the different histories of the Lakeshore Grounds. (You can read the first post here and the second post here).

After much planning and research, we are proud to announce that CHIME Digital Exhibit is now live! We invite you to visit lakeshoregrounds.ca/chime and explore all of our five pillars! This project has really become a labour of love for our members, and we are so proud to finally be able to lift the curtain on our exhibits and show off all our hard work.

In the theme of reveals, we thought this blog post was a great opportunity to introduce ourselves to you! If you have been following along with the progress of our project you are aware that our name CHIME stands for the five themed pillars; College, Hospital, Indigenous, Movies, and Ecology. Each of our pillars has its own curator, get to know them below!

Teachers’ College – Leila

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Here we can see Leila completing a portion of her extensive research. Notice the historic photos of the area she was able to uncover!

Leila’s research of the Teachers’ College which once called Humber’s A & B buildings home began with a general survey of the history of the College, but quickly evolved into a passion project studying the architecture of the former Teachers’ College. She has been travelling around the city visiting the Archives of Ontario to examine architectural drawings and has even partnered with a local architect to recreate the models of what the Teachers’ College may have looked like during its height of use. When asked about her work Leila said that she “hopes my exhibition helps visitors to become aware and admire the effect of such a modern architecture would have had the cohorts of Canadian educators who were educated here during the 1950s.”

Psychiatric Hospital – Heather

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Here we see Heather putting the final touches on her pillar

In January Heather began to delicately and respectfully investigate the history of the Psychiatric Hospital which once called the Etobicoke-Lakeshore area home. Heather closely consulted Lakeshore Grounds Interpretive Centre staff for guidance to ensure her exhibit was both an educational and respectful experience for the viewer. What excites Heather most about her exhibit is that it can be used as walking guide of campus, through this she used the physical changes of the area to show the evolution of treatment of mental illness in Canada which occurred over the 89 years the hospital was operational.

Indigenous – Nadine

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Here we see Nadine carefully editing each page of our exhibit in preparation for the launch

Our fearless leader Nadine has been working tirelessly researching the Indigenous heritage of the Etobicoke Lakeshore and the greater Toronto area. Through her research Nadine explores the many historic trading paths which intersect across the city. Due to the volume and use of these paths many of them have over the course of time become the main roads we still use today! It is Nadine’s hope that this exhibit will educate views about the history of the area as well as encourage a new appreciation for contemporary indigenous culture.

Movies – Maya

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Just this week film crews were spotted by our resident film set sleuth on campus!

Maya’s pillar is one all film fans will want to pay close attention to! She’s been looking into the use of the Lakeshore Grounds as a filming location for popular film and television. Did you know that last summer’s blockbuster hit Suicide Squad was filmed here on campus?! Through her research Maya has developed a surefire guide to spotting filming crews on campus to share with viewers! Who knows what movie the area will pop-up in next?

Ecology – Hillary

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Here we see Hillary listening to some beautiful bird calls as part of her research. Listen to the call of the Gray Jay here.

Hillary has designed her exhibit as an invitation for viewers to get outside and explore the beautiful landscapes of the Etobicoke Lakeshore area. Through her research she had become familiar with the countless plants and animals who call Colonel Samuel Smith Park home. Did you know over 270 different species of birds live in the park? Our park is even home to Canada’s new national bird, the Gray Jay! Take a walk through the park yourself and see how many different types of flora and fauna you can spot! Hillary hopes that through this exhibit you will feel inspired to advocate for the protection of the Etobicoke Lakeshore area and all the creatures who call it home.

The CHIME Digital Exhibits team truly hopes that you enjoy our exhibit as much as we have enjoyed writing and designing it for you this term. We would also like to express our deepest thanks to Jennifer from the Lakeshore Grounds Interpretive Centre for all of her help and guidance through this process.

Until next time this is CHIME, chiming off.

 

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Announcing CHIME Digital Exhibits

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CHIME Digital Exhibits logo

This is a special guest post submitted by the members of the CHIME Digital Exhibits group. It is the first in a series of posts that will document the group’s development of a digital exhibit that will feature the different histories of the Lakeshore Grounds.

As Japanese game designer Hideo Kojima once said, “Building the future and keeping the past alive are one and the same thing.” As a heritage group, it’s a sentiment that we can’t help but latch onto, especially during a time when Humber College is rapidly expanding its scope and undergoing construction of numerous new facilities.

One of the most notable factors in making Humber’s Lakeshore campus a popular option for students is due to the character of the area. Rather than sitting in massive lecture halls and trudging through plain, industrial buildings to get to class or study, those who work and study on the Lakeshore Grounds get the unique opportunity to walk through history.

However, not everyone who studies here appreciates what they are a part of, and a new student project is aiming to fix that.

Launching at the end of the current semester is CHIME Digital Exhibits, an undertaking intended to promote awareness of the history and heritage of the Lakeshore Grounds and Colonel Samuel Smith Park.

Collaborating with the Lakeshore Grounds Interpretive Centre, CHIME will be providing an interactive, five-part virtual exhibition on the heritage and ecology of the Etobicoke-Lakeshore area. The exhibit includes five pillars, which compose Humber’s history as well as the subjects from which the project name is formed: (teachers’) College, (psychiatric) Hospital, Indigenous community, Movie sets, and Ecological zone. Together, the exhibits will enhance community learning and facilitate involvement and contributions to the ongoing legacy of the area.

Being run by six students in Humber’s Arts Administration and Cultural Management Program, the CHIME Digital Exhibits group wants to encourage Humber students to learn about and appreciate the narrative of the neighborhood before Humber College, and engage the surrounding community with their cultural, historical, and ecological legacies.

The exhibit will be completely free to access and available for the general public to view, featuring exclusive documents, images, video, audio from all five pillars of the area’s history. Additionally, social media outlets are currently running in conjunction with the exhibit, encouraging students and community members to share their own stories about Etobicoke and Humber using the official #CHIMEin hashtag.

The webpage featuring the exhibit will launch on April 22, 2017 at lakeshoregrounds.ca

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/CHIMEdigitalexh/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/CHIMEdigitalexh

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/chimedigitalexh/

For more information, or to contribute, contact: chimeinterpretive@gmail.com

Designing a new Storytelling Event: Can You See What I See?

FullSizeRenderWe have an interesting challenge here at the Lakeshore Grounds Interpretive Centre because we focus on four rather unique histories:

  • The history and culture of the Ojibwe Anishinaabe and Iroquoian peoples;
  • The history of the Lakeshore Psychiatric Hospital;
  • The history of education in the Lakeshore Grounds area including the Lakeshore Teachers’ College and Humber College; and
  • The history of ecological development in Colonel Samuel Smith Park

Each topic is rich and diverse all on its own – but the topics also knit together beautifully in the tapestry that is the history of the Lakeshore Grounds.

Most of our events and exhibits deal with one topic at a time – but this Saturday, March 25th, we’re taking on the challenge of presenting the woven tapestry as a whole. Our goal is to encourage everyone to look at the Lakeshore Grounds with fresh eyes, to see the different threads that have made it what it is today.

With the support of Myseum of Toronto, we’ve designed a new walking tour of the Lakeshore Grounds that begins at the Interpretive Centre, takes us through the Humber campus (yes, there’s a quick peak at the tunnels) and ends in Colonel Samuel Smith Park. And it’s not just a new tour route, Can You See What I See? is a storytelling event combined with a guided tour. That means that throughout the tour route you will encounter storytellers who will share short stories inspired by the indigenous, psychiatric, educational, and ecological histories of the Lakeshore Grounds.

Tours leave every hour with the first tour at 12pm and the last leaving at 4pm from the Lakeshore Grounds Interpretive Centre. The tours last roughly 1.25 hours and the route is fully mobility accessible (ASL interpretation available on the 12pm tour).

Come explore the Lakeshore Grounds with us and see its familiar sights from a new angle. Register for your preferred tour time by clicking here.

Looking for something a little EXTRA special? Myseum is coordinating a bus from Toronto that will include both the Can You See What I See? tours and the mAPPing the Territory exhibition at Humber’s North Space Gallery. The event is free but space is limited so be sure to reserve your seat by clicking here!

 

Black History Month

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Photo linked from JeanAugustine.ca

The month of February is Black History Month in Canada. This is a  month that recognizes the important contributions and history of the Black community in our country. I approached our Curator earlier this month and said I wanted to draw attention to several Black Canadians who I think everyone should know. One blog post cannot cover the long list of names I have read about recently, but I wanted to acknowledge a few that stood out to me who have made significant historical and social contributions to Canada.

The first person I want to highlight is Jean Augustine. I came across Augustine’s name when I first started looking into the history of Black History Month in Canada.

Jean Augustine is a former Member of Parliament for Etobicoke-Lakeshore. It is because of her efforts that we now celebrate Black History Month in Canada. In 1993, she became the first Black female Member of Parliament where she advocated for cultural diversity, women’s issues, and immigration rights. In 1995, it was Augustine who brought forward a motion to officially recognize Black History Month in Canada to talk about the important contributions made by Black Canadians throughout our history. In December 1995, her motion passed with a unanimous vote.

A second Canadian that I want to highlight is Viola Desmond, a prominent citizen of Nova Scotia. She was a beautician and entrepreneur in Halifax who brought national attention to human rights with her famous court case:

One night in November 1946 Desmond decided to go to the Roseland Theatre to see a film while her car was being repaired. She sat in the “Whites Only Area” of the theatre. After refusing to go to the “Coloured Only” section, Desmond was arrested and jailed overnight. She was eventually charged with tax fraud, and ordered to pay a $26 fine. Despite hiring a lawyer to help overturn the decision, the charges remained until 2010 when the Nova Scotia government made a formal apology to Desmond’s family.

Viola Desmond will be the first woman to appear on Canadian currency. Her image will be on the $10 bill beginning in 2018. I think it is important to speak about Viola Desmond because she is a prime example of someone who saw an injustice and acted against it.

A third story that caught my attention is the story of the No. 2 Construction Battalion:

When the War broke out, it was extremely difficult for Black men to join the Canadian military. However, in July 1916, the very first Canadian Black Battalion was formed in Nova Scotia with a total of 600 men accepted for service. The No. 2 Construction Battalion was not given a combat role in the War – in March 1918 they were deployed to Liverpool, England, and then France, to work with the Canadian Forestry Corps. Eventually, some of the men joined regular units to fight on the front lines of the War. Many of these men were awarded medals for their war efforts.

It is important to acknowledge the war efforts of Black soldiers. When war broke out, there was much discrimination against people of colour by Canada’s government and military. These men were able to break through racial barriers, which shows that when you fight for something you believe in, changes can come.

This is only a small list of important Black Canadians in our history. I encourage our readers to do your own research and share what you learn with your family and peers. Some great places to start include:

Black History Canada from Historica Canada

Ontario Black History Society